World-renowned 18th and 19th Century attractions, exciting urban developments and verdant garden spaces combine to make Munich the destination of choice.

Here are 6 must-visit districts in the city of Munich:

Werksviertel-Mitte

Werksviertel-Mitte is home to a dazzling array of cosy cafes, chic stores, creative hubs and incubation studios. Once the city’s industrial district, the area has been transformed into a happening and trendy space:

  • Bavarian Radio Symphony Ochestra and cultural institution
  • TonHalle
  • Hi-Sky Munchen – 78-meter tall Ferris wheel which can carry up to 1,300 passengers per hour

Schwabing

Schwabing is Munich’s bohemian and artistic quarter – and the place where the city’s best writers and cultural intellects gather. From the historic streets of Leopoldstrasse and Hohenzollernstrasse to the alleyways of Altschwabing, it’s easy to spot famous intellects like filmmaker Doris Dörrie, writers Patrick Süskind and Hans Magnus Enzensberger, as well as the idealist and free thinker Rainer Langhans.

Schwabing is also a melting pot of interesting eateries, eclectic shops and beer gardens. Plus, the district is where several renowned attractions including:

  • Siegestor
  • Englischer Garten
  • Lenbachhaus Art Museum

Maxvorstadt

Munich’s university district is also home to museums and art galleries containing hundreds of great European and works of art including:

  • Antikensammlung
  • Glyptothek
  • Alte Pinakothek
  • Neue Pinakothek
  • Pinakothek der Moderne
  • Lenbachhaus
  • Museum Brandhorst

In addition to art museums, the district is also where the Siegestor, an imposing 19th Century triumphal arch, stands. Commissioned by King Ludwig l of Bavaria, the arch’s Neoclassical architecture itself is unique to Maxvorstadt. Seated on top of the Siegestor, a bronze sculpture of Bavaria with four lions look toward the city. Come dusk, and at 9:20 PM, the light installation at Georg-Elser-Platz Square lights up to commemorate the heroic act of Georg Elser.

Bogenhausen

Bogenhausen is known for its lush greenery, centuries-old villas and close proximity to the Isar river. Of particular importance is the villa of the late sculptor, Adolf von Hildebrand which is now home to the Monacensia Library. The library houses a massive collection of some 150,000 books written by the city’s numerous authors about Munich. Spend an entire morning browsing the collection of literary works before making a trip to the late writer Thomas Mann’s villa to admire the building’s immaculate art nouveau façade and structure.

To experience a bygone era, take a walk along the area where the Old Parish Church of St. Georg stands to have a feel of the Old Bogenhausen. It is also worth strolling through this area to take a peek at the district’s 18th and 19th Century villas.

Haidhausen

Munich’s French Quarter is the place for both music and museum lovers to be. Important attractions that dominate the area include:

  • Deutsches Museum
  • Maximilianeum
  • Museum Villa Stuck
  • Gasteig Kulturzentrum (Gasteig Cultural Centre) – hosts the Munich Philharmonic Orchestra

Gärtnerplatz

The district of Gärtnerplatz exudes an atmosphere like nowhere else in the city, making it the ideal place to hang out and relax. Dozens of cafés and restaurants are scattered amongst small boutiques and grocery stores.

When night arrives, Gärtnerplatz transforms into a hive of activity for theatre-goers and art lovers. At the Staatstheater am Gärtnerplatz theatre, catch the latest opera and or musical.

On the other sides of the borough, carefully-coordinated coloured three- and four-storey buildings that are fondly known as “Gärtnerplatz Red” by the city’s locals line the road.

From art galleries, museums to green spaces, discover the city’s hip and happening side. Whether you’re an art aficionado, literati, food lover or intrepid explorer, Munich is a treasure trove of Southern German exploration.