The flagship carrier for Singapore announced today that they would stop serving nuts of all kinds on all their flights across classes on Monday, April 30.

This is a move that follows similar new policies by other airlines. Qantas, Air New Zealand and British Airways have all stopped serving all sorts of peanuts in packets.

What prompted this?

While there has been no statement from Singapore Airlines on what made them go forward with this decision, the case of a toddler on one of their flights must be noted.

According to reports, the carrier launched a review last year when a toddler exhibited symptoms of asphyxiation on one of the flights from Singapore to Melbourne.

The reports said that the child began to exhibit swollen eyes, vomiting, and difficulty breathing when someone opened a package of peanuts inside the airplane.

The child was reportedly experiencing anaphylaxis, which is a life-threatening reaction to certain allergens.

The reaction was thankfully brought under control since the parents had medicine to counter it with them.

Not the first time this has happened

A 10-year-old boy on a flight from Aruba to New York had experienced something similar as the toddler after ingesting one cashew on the flight.

May still not be completely nut-free

According to the Singapore Air website, though, they cannot guarantee a nut-free flight. Since the incident with the toddler occured with an opened bag of nuts by someone else on the flight, the airline could not control the snacks that people brought on the plane.

Their website says, “We’ll make every reasonable effort to accommodate your request for a nut-free meal. However, we’re unable to provide a nut-free cabin or guarantee an allergy-free environment on board. It’s not unusual for other passengers on our flights to be served meals and snacks containing nuts or their derivatives. We also have no control over passengers consuming their own snacks or meals on board, which may contain nuts or their derivatives.”

What do you think of this new rule? Let us know in the comments!

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