Desperate times call for desperate measures.

Now that there’s a 30% hike in taxes on water since hearing about it in Budget 2017, the latter is even scarcer than before. As we search hither and thither for ways to reduce our water usage, here are 10 tips for anyone who’s dead-pan serious about saving water should do:

  1. Bathe with our friends

Source: @mrbrown (Twitter).

Mr Brown has just voiced out what many of us had in mind for the longest time – yes, we really want to share a bath with our friends. Anyway, they’ve seen us in our most unglamourous state; so what difference would it make to see us in the nude?

 

  1. Or, bathe in rice water while bathing with your friends

Image provided by Shutterstock.com.

Who needs beauty and skin care products when the elixir to gorgeous hair and flawless skin is right at home? It’s high time to put rice water to the test, upon hearing so many heaping praises on this magical water that’s left over from cleaning the rice. Now there’s no excuse to pass up on this traditional practice originating from Japan.

 

  1. Wait for the next person to flush the toilet

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A little goes a long way; don’t belittle the copious amounts of water you can save by not flushing. Let the next person who’s going to use the toilet after you, have the honour of flushing – but at your own risk. Don’t say we didn’t warn you.

 

  1. Take a bath in the bathrooms at community centre gyms

What do you want the most after a sweaty and grimy workout at the community centre gym? Even if it’s not after a hardcore work-out, a cold and refreshing bath – that doesn’t cost a cent – at the nearby gym is just as tempting.

 

  1. Wash your hands at the Fountain of Wealth in Suntec City

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Tourists from all over the world come to this veritable fountain that is symbolic of life and fortune at Suntec City, in the hopes that the good feng shui here would rub off on them. Likewise, locals come here to shake off their bad luck – and of course, to wash their hands. If not, how else are we going to cut back on our water expenditure?

 

  1. Go for gym trials and use their bathing facilities

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Before you reject a salesperson promoting to you about the gym that everyone goes to these days, think about the long baths you can take without anyone knowing. You just might get lucky and be able to use the hot sauna in some of the gyms. Talk about killing two birds with one stone.

 

  1. Bathe before going home

If your workplace has a bathroom, what better time to take a shower than after work? Don’t let that tastefully-adorned executive toilet (that comes with shower amenities) in your office go to waste.

 

  1. Take a dip in our very own waters at Sentosa Island

Palawan Beach at Sentosa Island in Singapore. Image provided by Shutterstock.com.

We’re guessing the visitor rates for Palawan Beach and Tanjong Beach in Sentosa Island are shooting through the roof as the hike gets underway. In this sweltering heat that’s only going to intensify amidst global warming, many are going to take to the waters for a cool dip – that’s most importantly of all, free of charge and free from any tax hike, ever.

 

  1. Collect water when there’s a leaking tap

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Every drop of water counts. The next time your tap is leaking, leave a container below the leaking tap to collect water that’s perfectly clean for use. Just be careful it doesn’t breed Aedes mosquitos, especially if the estate you’re living in is a dengue hotspot.

 

  1. Brush our teeth with alcohol

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Never thought that this would apply in Singapore – more so in European countries where the alcohol is insanely cheap – but hey it’s a feasible and in fact, more effective way of brushing your teeth. After all, alcohol has anti-bacterial properties and who minds having cleaner teeth? Just that your breath may reek of alcohol, that’s all.

Come to think again, this 30% water tax hike isn’t that fazing after all. This just opens up our eyes to a riot of limitless possibilities of substitutes for water. Well, we still have two years before this hike kicks into full swing.